CambridgeshireMid East BranchRSPCATips from the RSPCA on caring for animals in winterWild BirdsBirds will be grateful for the food we provide. They will like suitable seeds fed from a seed feederand peanuts, provided they are unsalted, from a reputable feed shop, in a good quality mesh feeder.Also cooked pasta or rice, boiled potatoes, cheese, raisins and sultanas, net-free suet balls, apples,pears, soft fruits and insects such as mealworms and waxworms. Fresh water for birds is essential.They need water to drink and to bathe in. Check for ice every day. Be aware - grapes, sultanasand raisins are toxic to dogs.CatsKeep cats in during the hours of darkness when temperatures reach their lowest and to keep themsafe. Keep doors of sheds and outbuildings shut or wedged open, so that cats do not becometrapped inside. Check your cat flap to make sure it hasn't frozen or become blocked by snow.DogsIf your dog feels the cold, best to walk him in the late morning or early aftemoon when temperaturesare a little higher. Dogs with thin coats may need a dog coat for winter talks. Take care of paws -keep your dog's feet clean of ice, dirt and salt picked up from outdoors.RabbitsIf your rabbits live outside, it is very important to ensuretheir home is protected from extremes of weather andtemperature. Their home should be waterproof, draught-proof, damp-proof, dry and ventilated. Covers to insulateand weather-proof hutches are available commercially, orcan be made from a tarpaulin or piece of carpet for useat night. Give rabbits lots of additional bedding - hay andstraw - in the winter. Make sure they have a healthy dietand fresh water. Keep their accommodation clean and dry.The photo shows a tough but transparent tarpaulincovering the mesh front of this all-in-one rabbit house andrun.Moving your rabbits' home into a shed, outhouse or unused garage is a good way to help keepthem warm. See more detailed advice on rabbit care in winter on the RSPCA's national website:-www.rspca.org.ukHorsesAdequate shelter, company, a good supply of extra and appropriate feed are all important. A goodworking routine is also very important. If you are unable to devote more time to your horse duringthe winter, consider keeping your horse at livery, or network amongst local horse owners; you maybe able to share horse care witha like-minded friend.More advice is available from the various horse organisations, but see The British Horse Societywebsite: www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness//winter-care.www.rspca-cambridgeshiremideast.org.ukReg. Charity No. 205294 Cambridgeshire Mid East Branch RSPCA Tips from the RSPCA on caring for animals in winter Wild Birds Birds will be grateful for the food we provide. They will like suitable seeds fed from a seed feeder and peanuts, provided they are unsalted, from a reputable feed shop, in a good quality mesh feeder. Also cooked pasta or rice, boiled potatoes, cheese, raisins and sultanas, net-free suet balls, apples, pears, soft fruits and insects such as mealworms and waxworms. Fresh water for birds is essential. They need water to drink and to bathe in. Check for ice every day. Be aware - grapes, sultanas and raisins are toxic to dogs. Cats Keep cats in during the hours of darkness when temperatures reach their lowest and to keep them safe. Keep doors of sheds and outbuildings shut or wedged open, so that cats do not become trapped inside. Check your cat flap to make sure it hasn't frozen or become blocked by snow. Dogs If your dog feels the cold, best to walk him in the late morning or early aftemoon when temperatures are a little higher. Dogs with thin coats may need a dog coat for winter talks. Take care of paws - keep your dog's feet clean of ice, dirt and salt picked up from outdoors. Rabbits If your rabbits live outside, it is very important to ensure their home is protected from extremes of weather and temperature. Their home should be waterproof, draught- proof, damp-proof, dry and ventilated. Covers to insulate and weather-proof hutches are available commercially, or can be made from a tarpaulin or piece of carpet for use at night. Give rabbits lots of additional bedding - hay and straw - in the winter. Make sure they have a healthy diet and fresh water. Keep their accommodation clean and dry. The photo shows a tough but transparent tarpaulin covering the mesh front of this all-in-one rabbit house and run. Moving your rabbits' home into a shed, outhouse or unused garage is a good way to help keep them warm. See more detailed advice on rabbit care in winter on the RSPCA's national website:- www.rspca.org.uk Horses Adequate shelter, company, a good supply of extra and appropriate feed are all important. A good working routine is also very important. If you are unable to devote more time to your horse during the winter, consider keeping your horse at livery, or network amongst local horse owners; you may be able to share horse care witha like-minded friend. More advice is available from the various horse organisations, but see The British Horse Society website: www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness//winter-care. www.rspca-cambridgeshiremideast.org.uk Reg. Charity No. 205294

Date: 07 January 2020

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Cambridgeshire Mid East Branch RSPCA Tips from the RSPCA on caring for animals in winter Wild Birds Birds will be grateful for the food we provide. They will like suitable seeds fed from a seed feeder and peanuts, provided they are unsalted, from a reputable feed shop, in a good quality mesh feeder. Also cooked pasta or rice, boiled potatoes, cheese, raisins and sultanas, net-free suet balls, apples, pears, soft fruits and insects such as mealworms and waxworms. Fresh water for birds is essential. They need water to drink and to bathe in. Check for ice every day. Be aware - grapes, sultanas and raisins are toxic to dogs. Cats Keep cats in during the hours of darkness when temperatures reach their lowest and to keep them safe. Keep doors of sheds and outbuildings shut or wedged open, so that cats do not become trapped inside. Check your cat flap to make sure it hasn't frozen or become blocked by snow. Dogs If your dog feels the cold, best to walk him in the late morning or early aftemoon when temperatures are a little higher. Dogs with thin coats may need a dog coat for winter talks. Take care of paws - keep your dog's feet clean of ice, dirt and salt picked up from outdoors. Rabbits If your rabbits live outside, it is very important to ensure their home is protected from extremes of weather and temperature. Their home should be waterproof, draught- proof, damp-proof, dry and ventilated. Covers to insulate and weather-proof hutches are available commercially, or can be made from a tarpaulin or piece of carpet for use at night. Give rabbits lots of additional bedding - hay and straw - in the winter. Make sure they have a healthy diet and fresh water. Keep their accommodation clean and dry. The photo shows a tough but transparent tarpaulin covering the mesh front of this all-in-one rabbit house and run. Moving your rabbits' home into a shed, outhouse or unused garage is a good way to help keep them warm. See more detailed advice on rabbit care in winter on the RSPCA's national website:- www.rspca.org.uk Horses Adequate shelter, company, a good supply of extra and appropriate feed are all important. A good working routine is also very important. If you are unable to devote more time to your horse during the winter, consider keeping your horse at livery, or network amongst local horse owners; you may be able to share horse care witha like-minded friend. More advice is available from the various horse organisations, but see The British Horse Society website: www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness//winter-care. www.rspca-cambridgeshiremideast.org.uk Reg. Charity No. 205294 Cambridgeshire Mid East Branch RSPCA Tips from the RSPCA on caring for animals in winter Wild Birds Birds will be grateful for the food we provide. They will like suitable seeds fed from a seed feeder and peanuts, provided they are unsalted, from a reputable feed shop, in a good quality mesh feeder. Also cooked pasta or rice, boiled potatoes, cheese, raisins and sultanas, net-free suet balls, apples, pears, soft fruits and insects such as mealworms and waxworms. Fresh water for birds is essential. They need water to drink and to bathe in. Check for ice every day. Be aware - grapes, sultanas and raisins are toxic to dogs. Cats Keep cats in during the hours of darkness when temperatures reach their lowest and to keep them safe. Keep doors of sheds and outbuildings shut or wedged open, so that cats do not become trapped inside. Check your cat flap to make sure it hasn't frozen or become blocked by snow. Dogs If your dog feels the cold, best to walk him in the late morning or early aftemoon when temperatures are a little higher. Dogs with thin coats may need a dog coat for winter talks. Take care of paws - keep your dog's feet clean of ice, dirt and salt picked up from outdoors. Rabbits If your rabbits live outside, it is very important to ensure their home is protected from extremes of weather and temperature. Their home should be waterproof, draught- proof, damp-proof, dry and ventilated. Covers to insulate and weather-proof hutches are available commercially, or can be made from a tarpaulin or piece of carpet for use at night. Give rabbits lots of additional bedding - hay and straw - in the winter. Make sure they have a healthy diet and fresh water. Keep their accommodation clean and dry. The photo shows a tough but transparent tarpaulin covering the mesh front of this all-in-one rabbit house and run. Moving your rabbits' home into a shed, outhouse or unused garage is a good way to help keep them warm. See more detailed advice on rabbit care in winter on the RSPCA's national website:- www.rspca.org.uk Horses Adequate shelter, company, a good supply of extra and appropriate feed are all important. A good working routine is also very important. If you are unable to devote more time to your horse during the winter, consider keeping your horse at livery, or network amongst local horse owners; you may be able to share horse care witha like-minded friend. More advice is available from the various horse organisations, but see The British Horse Society website: www.bhs.org.uk/advice-and-information/horse-health-and-sickness//winter-care. www.rspca-cambridgeshiremideast.org.uk Reg. Charity No. 205294